Algeria to benefit from satellite services

02 April 2024

Algérie Télécom signed a partnership agreement with Algérie Télécom Satellite (ATS) to improve connectivity services for citizens and businesses.

The partnership is part of Algérie Telecom’s global strategy focused on technological innovation and continuous improvement of service quality. The company has already signed agreements with Djezzy and Ooredoo and is now turning to satellites, which offers a greater range, allowing it to reach even populations living in rural, remote areas and difficult to access for its terrestrial networks.

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Nilesat opts for Hughes system gateway, due by fourth quarter

02 April 2024

Nilesat has purchased a Hughes JUPITER™ System Gateway and will use Hughes JUPITER terminals for its Nilesat 301 satellite. The implementation will begin in the second quarter of this year and is expected to be complete by the end of the third quarter.

“The Nilesat vision is to be the role model for satellite services in the MENA region,” said Major General Sameh Katta, chairman and CEO Nilesat. “After careful technical and commercial evaluation, we verified that the Hughes JUPITER System provided the efficiency, reliability, flexibility and high performance needed to help us offer the best service delivery to Nilesat subscribers.”

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Africa offline amidst cable outages

02 April 2024

On 14 March, large swathes of Africa were left without internet connectivity following a catastrophic subsea cable outage. The WACS, ACE, MainOne and SAT3 subsea systems have all been affected, impacting on connectivity across Liberia, Benin, Ghana, and Burkina Faso, the Gambia, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Niger, Namibia, South Africa, and Lesotho, among others.

MainOne, owned by Equinix, said that an external incident resulted in the damage to its cable system, and has ruled out human activity as a cause.

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Zimbabwe ponders satellite

28 March 2024

The Zimbabwean government is considering partnerships with several satellite internet providers to expand services in the country and reduce costs, reported Tatenda Mavetera, minister of information and communication technologies, postal and courier services.

“We are a landlocked country, so just getting data from where it came from already incurs costs. What we can do is consider other innovative ways. If this means that we have to use satellite companies, it cannot only concern one particular company, namely Starlink,” said Mavetera.

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